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SHR Neuro Cancer Cardio Lipid

Oris, C; Pereira, B; Durif, J; Simon-Pimmel, J; Castellani, C; Manzano, S; Sapin, V; Bouvier, D.
The Biomarker S100B and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Meta-analysis.
Pediatrics. 2018;
Web of Science PubMed FullText FullText_MUG

 

Authors Med Uni Graz:
Castellani Christoph
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Abstract:
The usefulness of S100B has been noted as a biomarker in the management of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adults. However, S100B efficacy as a biomarker in children has previously been relatively unclear. A meta-analysis is conducted to assess the prognostic value of S100B in predicting intracerebral lesions in children after mTBI. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Studies including children suffering mTBI who underwent S100B measurement and computed tomography (CT) scans were included. Of 1030 articles screened, 8 studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall pooled sensitivity and specificity were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 98%-100%) and 34% (95% CI: 30%-38%), respectively. A second analysis was based on the collection of 373 individual data points from 4 studies. Sensitivity and specificity results, obtained from reference ranges in children with a sampling time <3 hours posttrauma, were 97% (95% CI: 84.2%-99.9%) and 37.5% (95% CI: 28.8%-46.8%), respectively. Only 1 child had a low S100B level and a positive CT scan result without clinically important traumatic brain injury. Only patients undergoing both a CT scan and S100B testing were selected for evaluation. S100B serum analysis as a part of the clinical routine could significantly reduce the number of CT scans performed on children with mTBI. Sampling should take place within 3 hours of trauma. Cutoff levels should be based on pediatric reference ranges. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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