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Marschik, PB; Einspieler, C; Sigafoos, J.
Contributing to the early detection of Rett syndrome: the potential role of auditory Gestalt perception.
Res Dev Disabil. 2012; 33(2):461-466 [OPEN ACCESS]
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Authors Med Uni Graz:
Einspieler Christa
Marschik Peter
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Abstract:
To assess whether there are qualitatively deviant characteristics in the early vocalizations of children with Rett syndrome, we had 400 native Austrian-German speakers listen to audio recordings of vocalizations from typically developing girls and girls with Rett syndrome. The audio recordings were rated as (a) inconspicuous, (b) conspicuous or (c) not able to decide between (a) and (b). The results showed that participants were accurate in differentiating the vocalizations of typically developing children compared to children with Rett syndrome. However, the accuracy for rating verbal behaviors was dependent on the type of vocalization with greater accuracy for canonical babbling compared to cooing vocalizations. The results suggest a potential role for the use of rating child vocalizations for early detection of Rett syndrome. This is important because clinical criteria related to speech and language development remain important for early identification of Rett syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Find related publications in this database (using NLM MeSH Indexing)
Adult -
Child Language -
Child, Preschool -
Diagnosis, Differential -
Early Diagnosis -
Female -
Gestalt Theory -
Humans -
Infant -
Language Development Disorders - diagnosis
Male -
Rett Syndrome - diagnosis
Speech -
Tape Recording -
Verbal Behavior -
Videotape Recording -
Young Adult -

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
Rett syndrome
Audio experiment
Early identification
Gestalt perception
Vocalization
Babbling
Cooing
Speech
Language
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