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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Laimer, M; Namberger, K; Massone, C; Koller, J; Emberger, M; Pleyer, L; Hintner, H; Greil, R.
Vincristine, idarubicin, dexamethasone and thalidomide in scleromyxoedema.
Acta Derm Venereol. 2009; 89(6): 631-635. [OPEN ACCESS]
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Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Massone Cesare
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Abstract:
Scleromyxoedema is a rare disease of unknown aetiology that is characterized by progressive cutaneous mucinosis and paraproteinaemia. A variety of systemic (e.g. gastro intestinal, neurological, pulmonary, cardiac and renal) complications may lead to significant morbidity and mortality necessitating therapeutic intervention. The latter remains challenging. Numerous treatment modalities have been reported in the literature, often, however, with inconsistent responses, frequent relapses and potentially serious side-effects. Moreover, the rarity of scleromyxoedema has prevented the execution of controlled therapeutic trials. This paper discusses current proposed therapeutic strategies and reports the case of a 64-year-old male patient with progressive scleromyxoedema associated with IgG-lambda paraproteinaemia in whom monthly administrations of vincristine, idarubicin and dexamethasone in addition to daily oral thalidomide led to clinical and laboratory remission within 12 weeks.
Find related publications in this database (using NLM MeSH Indexing)
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Dexamethasone - therapeutic use
Drug Administration Schedule -
Drug Therapy, Combination -
Humans -
Idarubicin - therapeutic use
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male -
Middle Aged -
Paraproteinemias - complications
Remission Induction -
Scleromyxedema - complications
Thalidomide - therapeutic use
Vincristine - therapeutic use

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
chemotherapy
paraproteinaemia
mucinosis
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