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Chien, AL; Suh, J; Cesar, SSA; Fischer, AH; Cheng, N; Poon, F; Rainer, B; Leung, S; Martin, J; Okoye, GA; Kang, S.
Pigmentation in African American skin decreases with skin aging.
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016; 75(4):782-787
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Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Rainer Barbara
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Abstract:
Tristimulus colorimetry, which uses the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* model to quantify color, has previously been used to analyze pigmentation and erythema in human skin; however, colorimetry of African American skin is not well characterized. We sought to analyze skin color patterns in African Americans and compare them with those of Caucasians. Colorimetry readings of the sun-protected buttock and sun-exposed back of forearm were taken from 40 Caucasian and 43 African American participants from March 2011 through August 2015. African American participants also completed a lifestyle questionnaire. Correlation coefficients, paired t tests, and multivariable linear regression analyses were used for statistical comparisons. Forearm skin was lighter in African Americans ages 65 years and older versus 18 to 30 years (P = .02) but darker in Caucasians ages 65 years or older versus 18 to 30 years (P = .03). In African Americans ages 18 to 30 years, the buttock was darker than the forearm (P < .001), whereas in Caucasians the buttock was lighter than the forearm (P < .001). A lighter forearm than buttock was correlated with supplement use, smoking (ages 18-30 years), and less recreational sun exposure (ages ≥65 years) in African Americans. Our study was limited by the sample size and focal geographic source. Pigmentation patterns regarding sun-protected and sun-exposed areas in African Americans may differ from that of Caucasians, suggesting that other factors may contribute to skin pigmentation in African Americans. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Find related publications in this database (using NLM MeSH Indexing)
Adult -
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors -
Aged -
Aging - physiology
Cohort Studies -
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Follow-Up Studies -
Humans -
Hypopigmentation - physiopathology
Male -
Middle Aged -
Pigmentation - physiology
Retrospective Studies -
Risk Assessment -
Skin Aging - physiology
Young Adult -

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
African Americans
aging
Caucasians
colorimetry
ethnic skin
sun-exposed skin
sun-protected skin
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