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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Tripolt, P; Arzt-Gradwohl, L; Čerpes, U; Laipold, K; Binder, B; Sturm, GJ.
Large local reactions and systemic reactions to insect stings: Similarities and differences.
PLoS One. 2020; 15(4): e0231747-e0231747. [OPEN ACCESS]
Web of Science PubMed PUBMED Central FullText FullText_MUG

 

Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Arzt-Gradwohl Lisa
Binder Barbara
Cerpes Urban
Sturm Gunter
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Abstract:
Large local reactions (LLR) to Hymenoptera stings were considered as IgE-mediated late-phase inflammatory reactions. However, in older studies, most patients with LLR were skin test positive, but only around 50% had detectable sIgE determined by the RAST system. Data of 620 patients were evaluated retrospectively: 310 patients who suffered from LLR and 310 patients with previous systemic sting reactions (SSR). We aimed to clarify if sIgE can generally be detected by the CAP system in patients with LLR; sIgE levels and clinical parameters were compared between patients with LLR and SSR. Positive sIgE levels were detected in 80.7% of patients with LLR, and in 95.2% of patients with SSR (p<0.001). Of the 310 patients with LLR, 80.6% had a LLR with a size of 10-20cm, whereas 19.4% had swellings >20cm, with a mean duration of seven days. In only 2.9% of patients, LLRs occurred after stings on the trunk, while 14.8% of SSR resulted from stings on this site (p<0.001). Similarly, LLR were also less frequent on the capillitium compared to SSR (8.1% versus 26.2%; p = 0.035). LLR usually persisted over seven days and about one fifth of patients had swellings greater than 20cm. Contrary to SSR, LLR were less frequently observed on the capillitium and on the trunk. In most patients with LLR, sIgE could be detected. However, total IgE and sIgE levels to bee or vespid venom did not differ between patients with LLR and SSR.

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