Medizinische Universität Graz Austria/Österreich - Forschungsportal - Medical University of Graz

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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Horn-Ritzinger, S; Bernhardt, J; Horn, M; Smolle, J.
Students' inductive reasoning skills and the relevance of prior knowledge: an exploratory study with a computer-based training course on the topic of acne vulgaris.
TEACH LEARN MED. 2011; 23(2): 130-136.
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Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Bernhardt-Melischnig Johannes
Horn Michael
Smolle Josef
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Abstract:
Background: The importance of inductive instruction in medical education is increasingly growing. Little is known about the relevance of prior knowledge regarding students' inductive reasoning abilities. Purpose: The purpose is to evaluate this inductive teaching method as a means of fostering higher levels of learning and to explore how individual differences in prior knowledge (high [HPK] vs. low [LPK]) contribute to students' inductive reasoning skills. Methods: Twenty-six LPK and 18 HPK students could train twice with an interactive computer-based training object to discover the underlying concept before doing the final comprehension check. Results: Students had a median of 76.9% of correct answers in the first, 90.9% in the second training, and answered 92% of the final assessment questions correctly. More important, 86% of all students succeeded with inductive learning, among them 83% of the HPK students and 89% of the LPK students. Conclusions: Prior knowledge did not predict performance on overall comprehension. This inductive instructional strategy fostered students' deep approaches to learning in a time-effective way.
Find related publications in this database (using NLM MeSH Indexing)
Acne Vulgaris -
Curriculum -
Dermatology - education
Educational Measurement -
Female -
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice -
Humans -
Internet -
Male -
Students, Medical -
Thinking -
User-Computer Interface -

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