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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Thrippleton, MJ; Backes, WH; Sourbron, S; Ingrisch, M; van Osch, MJP; Dichgans, M; Fazekas, F; Ropele, S; Frayne, R; van Oostenbrugge, RJ; Smith, EE; Wardlaw, JM.
Quantifying blood-brain barrier leakage in small vessel disease: Review and consensus recommendations.
ALZHEIMERS DEMENT. 2019; 15(6): 840-858. [OPEN ACCESS]
Web of Science PubMed PUBMED Central FullText FullText_MUG

 

Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Fazekas Franz
Ropele Stefan
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Abstract:
Cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) comprises pathological processes of the small vessels in the brain that may manifest clinically as stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia, or gait disturbance. It is generally accepted that endothelial dysfunction, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) failure, is pivotal in the pathophysiology. Recent years have seen increasing use of imaging, primarily dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, to assess BBB leakage, but there is considerable variability in the approaches and findings reported in the literature. Although dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is well established, challenges emerge in cSVD because of the subtle nature of BBB impairment. The purpose of this work, authored by members of the HARNESS Initiative, is to provide an in-depth review and position statement on magnetic resonance imaging measurement of subtle BBB leakage in clinical research studies, with aspects requiring further research identified. We further aim to provide information and consensus recommendations for new investigators wishing to study BBB failure in cSVD and dementia. Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
Cerebral small vessel disease
Dementia
Blood-brain barrier
Endothelial dysfunction
DCE-MRI
Permeability
MRI
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