Medizinische Universität Graz Austria/Österreich - Forschungsportal - Medical University of Graz

Logo MUG-Forschungsportal

Gewählte Publikation:

SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Krones, E; Wagner, M; Eller, K; Rosenkranz, AR; Trauner, M; Fickert, P.
Bile acid-induced cholemic nephropathy.
Dig Dis. 2015; 33(3):367-375
Web of Science PubMed FullText FullText_MUG

 

Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Eller Kathrin
Fickert Peter
Krones Elisabeth
Rosenkranz Alexander
Trauner Michael
Wagner Martin
Altmetrics:

Dimensions Citations:

Plum Analytics:
Abstract:
Kidney injury in deeply jaundiced patients became known as cholemic nephropathy. This umbrella term covers impaired renal function in cholestatic patients with characteristic histomorphological changes including intratubular cast formation and tubular epithelial cell injury. Cholemic nephropathy represents a widely underestimated but important cause of kidney dysfunction in patients with cholestasis and advanced liver disease. However, the nomenclature is inconsistent since there are numerous synonyms used; the underlying mechanisms of cholemic nephropathy are not entirely clear, and widely accepted diagnostic criteria are still missing. Consequently, the current article aims to summarize the present knowledge on the clinical and morphological characteristics, available preclinical models, derived potential pathomechanisms, and future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in cholemic nephropathy. Furthermore, we provide a potential research agenda for this evolving field. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Find related publications in this database (using NLM MeSH Indexing)
Acute Kidney Injury - etiology
Bile Acids and Salts - metabolism
Cholestasis - complications
Cholestasis - metabolism
Hepatorenal Syndrome - etiology
Humans -
Jaundice, Obstructive - complications
Jaundice, Obstructive - metabolism
Kidney Diseases - etiology
Kidney Diseases - pathology
Terminology as Topic -

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
Acute kidney injury
Cholemic nephropathy
Hepatorenal syndrome
© Meduni Graz Impressum