Medizinische Universität Graz Austria/Österreich - Forschungsportal - Medical University of Graz

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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Malle, E; Sodin-Semrl, S; Kovacevic, A.
Serum amyloid A: an acute-phase protein involved in tumour pathogenesis.
Cell Mol Life Sci. 2009; 66(1): 9-26. [OPEN ACCESS]
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Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Malle Ernst
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Abstract:
The synthesis of acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA) is largely regulated by inflammation- associated cytokines and a high concentration of circulating SAA may represent an ideal marker for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, SAA is also synthesized in extrahepatic tissues, e.g. human carcinoma metastases and cancer cell lines. An increasing body of in vitro data supports the concept of involvement of SAA in carcinogenesis and neoplastic diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that SAA might be included in a group of biomarkers to detect a pattern of physiological events that reflect the growth of malignancy and host response. This review is meant to provide a broad overview of the many ways that SAA could contribute to tumour development, and accelerate tumour progression and metastasis, and to gain a better understanding of this acute-phase reactant as a possible link between chronic inflammation and neoplasia.
Find related publications in this database (using NLM MeSH Indexing)
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - metabolism
Animals -
Biological Markers -
Cell Line, Tumor -
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic -
Humans -
Mice -
Neoplasms - blood
Receptors, Formyl Peptide - metabolism
Receptors, Immunologic - metabolism
Receptors, Lipoxin - metabolism
Scavenger Receptors, Class B - metabolism
Serum Amyloid A Protein - genetics
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
SAA
inflammation
renal cell carcinoma
extracellular matrix
rheumatoid arthritis
FPRL-1
MMP
proteomics
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