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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Alexopoulos, SJ; Chen, SY; Brandon, AE; Salamoun, JM; Byrne, FL; Garcia, CJ; Beretta, M; Olzomer, EM; Shah, DP; Philp, AM; Hargett, SR; Lawrence, RT; Lee, B; Sligar, J; Carrive, P; Tucker, SP; Philp, A; Lackner, C; Turner, N; Cooney, GJ; Santos, WL; Hoehn, KL.
Mitochondrial uncoupler BAM15 reverses diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice
NAT COMMUN. 2020; 11(1): 2397 [OPEN ACCESS]
Web of Science PubMed FullText FullText_MUG

 

Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Lackner Karoline
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Number of Figures: 6
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Abstract:
Obesity is a health problem affecting more than 40% of US adults and 13% of the global population. Anti-obesity treatments including diet, exercise, surgery and pharmacotherapies have so far failed to reverse obesity incidence. Herein, we target obesity with a pharmacotherapeutic approach that decreases caloric efficiency by mitochondrial uncoupling. We show that a recently identified mitochondrial uncoupler BAM15 is orally bioavailable, increases nutrient oxidation, and decreases body fat mass without altering food intake, lean body mass, body temperature, or biochemical and haematological markers of toxicity. BAM15 decreases hepatic fat, decreases inflammatory lipids, and has strong antioxidant effects. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies show that BAM15 improves insulin sensitivity in multiple tissue types. Collectively, these data demonstrate that pharmacologic mitochondrial uncoupling with BAM15 has powerful anti-obesity and insulin sensitizing effects without compromising lean mass or affecting food intake. Obesity is a global pandemic with limited treatment options. Here, the authors show evidence in mice that the mitochondrial uncoupler BAM15 effectively induces fat loss without affecting food intake or compromising lean body mass.

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