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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Krones, E; Pollheimer, MJ; Rosenkranz, AR; Fickert, P.
Cholemic nephropathy - Historical notes and novel perspectives.
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2018; 1864(4 Pt B):1356-1366
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Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Fickert Peter
Krones Elisabeth
Pollheimer Marion
Rosenkranz Alexander
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Abstract:
Acute kidney injury is common in patients with liver disease and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Besides bacterial infections, fluid loss, and use of nephrotoxic drugs AKI in liver disease may be triggered by tubular toxicity of cholephiles. Cholemic nephropathy, also known as bile cast nephropathy, supposedly represents a widely underestimated but important cause of renal dysfunction in cholestasic or advanced liver diseases with jaundice. Cholemic nephropathy describes impaired renal function along with characteristic histomorphological changes consisting of intratubular cast formation and tubular epithelial cell injury directed towards distal nephron segments. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are not entirely understood and clear defined diagnostic criteria are still missing. This review aims to summarize (i) the present knowledge on clinical and morphological characteristics of cholemic nephropathy, (ii) available preclinical models, (iii) potential pathomechanisms especially the potential role of bile acids, and (iv) future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cholemic nephropathy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cholangiocytes in Health and Disease edited by Jesus Banales, Marco Marzioni, Nicholas LaRusso and Peter Jansen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
Cholemic nephropathy
Bile cast nephropathy
Bile acids
Liver cirrhosis
Acute kidney injury
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