Medizinische Universität Graz Austria/Österreich - Forschungsportal - Medical University of Graz

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SHR Neuro Krebs Kardio Lipid

Fuchshuber, J; Hiebler-Ragger, M; Kresse, A; Kapfhammer, HP; Unterrainer, HF.
The Influence of Attachment Styles and Personality Organization on Emotional Functioning After Childhood Trauma.
Front Psychiatry. 2019; 10:643-643 [OPEN ACCESS]
Web of Science PubMed PUBMED Central FullText FullText_MUG

 

Autor/innen der Med Uni Graz:
Hiebler-Ragger Michaela
Kapfhammer Hans-Peter
Kresse Adelheid
Unterrainer Human-Friedrich
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Abstract:
Background: Current literature suggests a tenuous link among childhood trauma, personality organization, adult attachment, and emotional functioning in various psychiatric disorders. However, empirical research focusing on the interaction of these concepts is sparse. Therefore, this study intends to investigate the influence of personality organization and attachment dimensions on the relationship between childhood maltreatment and emotional functioning in adult life. To assess emotional functioning, we adopted the Affective Neuroscience model of primary emotions, comprising SEEKING, FEAR, ANGER, SADNESS, CARE, and PLAY. Methods: The total sample consisted of 616 nonclinical adults (Age: M = 30; SD = 9.53; 61.9% female). Path analysis was applied to investigate interactions among childhood trauma, personality organization, adult attachment, and primary emotion dispositions. Results: The findings suggest that childhood trauma significantly predicted deficits in personality organization and insecure attachment (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, a reduced level of personality organization was significantly associated with increased ANGER (p < 0.001), whereas adult attachment substantially predicted primary emotion dispositions in general. Moreover, the results indicate significant mediational effects of personality organization and attachment dimensions on the relationship between childhood trauma and primary emotions (p < 0.01). The final model was able to explain 48% of the variance in SADNESS, 38% in PLAY, 35% in FEAR, 28% in CARE, 14% in ANGER, and 13% in SEEKING. Discussion: The findings contribute to the understanding of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and impaired emotional functioning in adult life. Furthermore, the importance of personality organization and attachment dimensions for emotion regulation is underlined. Consequently, the treatment of patients with childhood trauma should focus on facilitating the development of more secure attachment patterns and increased personality functioning to improve overall emotional functioning.

Find related publications in this database (Keywords)
adult attachment
personality organization
structural equation modeling
childhood trauma
primary emotions
affect regulation
mediation
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